IRS.gov Banner
IRS NewswireApril 12, 2024

News Essentials

What’s Hot

News Releases

IRS – The Basics

IRS Guidance

Media Contacts

Facts & Figures

Around The Nation

e-News Subscriptions


The Newsroom Topics

Multimedia Center

Noticias en Español

Radio PSAs

Tax Scams

The Tax Gap

Fact Sheets

IRS Tax Tips

Armed Forces

Latest News Home


IRS Resources

Contact My Local Office

Filing Options

Forms & Instructions

Frequently Asked Questions

News

Taxpayer Advocate

Where to File

IRS Social Media


Issue Number:  IR-2024-108

Inside This Issue


IRS.gov offers last-minute filing tips, resources to help taxpayers who still need to file before April 15; special Saturday hours in 70 locations

WASHINGTON — With the April tax deadline arriving next week, the Internal Revenue Service today reminded millions of last-minute tax filers that the agency has a variety of free tools and resources available on IRS.gov.

From tax preparation, answers to tax law questions, refund tracking, tax law research to business topics and more, IRS.gov has everything needed for taxpayers to file on time or get an easy, automatic six-month extension to file. The IRS also has special Saturday hours available at 70 Taxpayer Assistance Centers across the country to help taxpayers.

“Millions of taxpayers across the nation will be working on their tax returns during the final hours, and people should remember they have many ways to get last-minute help,” said IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel. “We have a variety of free tools on IRS.gov that can help with basic tax law questions, provide free filing options, update refund status and even provide ways to request an extension for more time to file. We’re continuing our expanded special assistance for taxpayers right through the final weekend of tax season with special Saturday hours at 70 locations.”

For most of the nation, the tax deadline is April 15. Taxpayers in Maine and Massachusetts have until April 17 to file and pay taxes due this year. This is because these states observe the Patriots’ Day holiday on April 15 this year and April 16 is the Emancipation Day holiday in the District of Columbia. Other taxpayers in disaster areas, certain active-duty military members and citizens living abroad automatically get more time to file; more details are below.

For taxpayers who need an extension of time to file their taxes, there are several options to get an automatic extension through Oct. 15. Although an extension grants extra time to file, it does not extend the obligation to pay taxes due on April 15, 2024. To avoid penalties and late fees, taxpayers who owe should pay either their full tax bill or at least what they can afford to pay by the April 15 deadline.

The IRS estimates 19 million taxpayers will file for an automatic extension.

The IRS has already received more than 100 million tax returns, with tens of millions more expected to be filed as the tax deadline approaches.

“Delivering tax season is a massive undertaking, and we greatly appreciate people in many different areas working long hours to serve taxpayers as the tax deadline approaches,” Werfel added. “This effort reaches far beyond the IRS and includes hard-working tax professionals, software providers, the payroll community as well as our colleagues in the state tax agencies. Their work helping taxpayers makes a difference.” 

Get tax help, day or night

For those needing last-minute help, taxpayers will find filing information for individuals as well as businesses and self-employed on IRS.gov. For last-minute filers looking for free resources, IRS Direct File remains an option as does IRS Free File. Anyone can use IRS Free File to submit an extension of time to file regardless of their income.

IRS.gov is an important resource that can help in a number of areas:

  • For answers to tax law questions, taxpayers will find tools like the Interactive Tax Assistant or they can use the Frequently Asked Questions tool to find answers to dozens of topics.
  • To see federal tax information, taxpayers can use the Online Account. They’ll find information such as a payoff amount, a balance owed, their payment history and key information from their current year tax return as originally filed. They can also get tax return transcripts.
  • Use the Get Transcript tool to view, print or download their tax transcripts after the IRS has processed a return.
  • Current and prior year forms, instructions and tax publications can be downloaded and printed anytime.
  • Special information is available about tax credits and deductions, some of which can be overlooked. Available to individuals and businesses, credits can reduce the amount of tax due while deductions can reduce the amount of taxable income.
  • Get the most up-to-date information about tax refunds using the Where’s My Refund? tool and on the official IRS mobile app, IRS2Go.
  • For payment information, Direct Pay is free and allows people to securely pay their taxes directly from their checking or savings account without any fees or registration. They can schedule payments up to 365 days in advance. After submitting a payment through Direct Pay, they’ll receive immediate confirmation. For more payment options, visit irs.gov/payments

Go paperless The IRS encourages all taxpayers to file electronically and choose direct deposit to avoid refund delays. Filing on paper can significantly delay a refund. Tax software helps individuals steer clear of mistakes by doing the math. It also guides people through each section of their tax return using a question-and-answer format.

Some taxpayers get automatic extensions

Special rules offer some taxpayers more time without having to request an extension:

  • U.S. citizens and resident aliens who live and work outside of the United States and Puerto Rico get an automatic two-month extension, until June 15, to file their tax returns. However, tax payments are still due April 15 or interest will accrue on the unpaid tax.
  • Members of the military on duty outside the United States and Puerto Rico also receive an automatic two-month extension to file. Those serving in combat zones have up to 180 days after they leave the combat zone to file returns and pay any taxes due. Details are available in Publication 3, Armed Forces’ Tax Guide.
  • When the U.S. president makes a disaster area declaration, the IRS can postpone certain tax deadlines for taxpayers in affected areas. Taxpayers in qualified disaster areas do not need to submit an extension electronically or on paper. Information on the most recent tax relief for disaster situations can be found on the Extension of time to file your tax return page.

Find information on free local tax prep The IRS’ Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program offers free basic tax return preparation to qualified individuals, including:

  • People who generally make $64,000 or less.
  • People with disabilities.
  • Limited English-speaking taxpayers.

The Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) program also offers free tax help for taxpayers, particularly those age 60 and older.

The VITA/TCE Site Locator can help eligible taxpayers find the nearest community-based site staffed by IRS-trained and certified volunteers. Demand is high for this service, so taxpayers may experience longer wait times for appointments. Taxpayers can use the locator tool to find an available site near them. It’s updated throughout the tax season, so individuals should check back or increase the distance from their location in their search if they don’t see a nearby site listed.

MilTax, Military OneSource’s tax service, offers online software for eligible military members, veterans and their families to electronically file a federal return and up to three state returns for free.

Assistive technology options At the online Alternative Media Center, taxpayers will find a variety of accessible products like screen reading software, refreshable Braille displays and screen magnifying software. These products include tax forms, instructions and publications. Many can be downloaded or viewed online as Section 508 compliant PDF, HTML, eBraille, text and large print.

Having trouble paying? IRS has options to help

For those who owe a payment with their tax return, the IRS has a number of payment options.

For taxpayers that are unable to pay in full by the tax deadline, the IRS recommends they should file their tax return and pay what they can, and apply for an online payment plan. By filing by the deadline, taxpayers will avoid failure to file penalties and interest – even if they’re unable to pay. Taxpayers can explore various payments options; they can receive an immediate response of payment plan acceptance or denial without calling or writing to the IRS. Online payment plan options include:

  • Short-term payment plan – The total balance owed is less than $100,000 in combined tax, penalties and interest. Additional time of up to 180 days to pay the balance in full.
  • Long-term payment plan – The total balance owed is less than $50,000 in combined tax, penalties and interest. Pay in monthly payments for up to 72 months. Payments may be set up using direct debit (automatic bank withdraw) which eliminates the need to send in a payment each month, saving postage costs and reducing the chance of default. For balances between $25,000 and $50,000, direct debit is required.

Though interest and late-payment penalties continue to accrue on any unpaid taxes after April 15, the failure to pay penalty is cut in half while an installment agreement is in effect. Find more information about the costs of payment plans on the IRS’ Additional information on payment plans webpage.

Adjust withholding to prevent tax ‘surprises’ Tax filing season is an excellent time for taxpayers to check their withholding to avoid a tax surprise when filing in 2025. Life events like marriage, divorce, having a child or an income change can all impact taxes.

The Tax Withholding Estimator helps people bring the tax they pay closer to what is owed. Employees can assess their income tax, credits, adjustments and deductions, and determine whether they need to change their withholding by submitting a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate to their employer, not the IRS.

Back to Top


FaceBook Logo  YouTube Logo  Instagram Logo  Twitter Logo  LinkedIn Logo


Thank you for subscribing to the IRS Newswire, an IRS e-mail service.

If you know someone who might want to subscribe to this mailing list, please forward this message to them so they can subscribe.

This message was distributed automatically from the mailing list IRS Newswire. Please Do Not Reply To This Message.


This email was sent to irsblogposts@gmail.com by: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) · Internal Revenue Service · 1111 Constitution Ave. N.W. · Washington, D.C. 20535GovDelivery logo